3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment (ACR)

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    Post by AndrewA74 on Tue Sep 29, 2009 7:49 pm

    3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment (ACR) 3acrsymbols

    The 3d Armored Cavalry Regiment is a regiment of the United States Army currently stationed at Fort Hood, TX.

    The Regiment has a history in the United States Army that dates back to May 19, 1846, when it was Constituted in the Regular Army as the Regiment of Mounted Riflemen at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri. This unit was reorganized at the start of the American Civil War as the 3rd U.S. Cavalry Regiment on August 3, 1861. Today, "3rd" has been replaced by the designator "3d" in the regiment's title, and the word "armored" has been added to recognize it as a heavy cavalry regiment (equipped with M1 Abrams tanks and M3 Bradley cavalry fighting vehicles)

    Under various names it has seen action during ten major conflicts: the Indian Wars, the Mexican-American War, the American Civil War, the Spanish-American War, the Philippine-American War, World War I, World War II, the Persian Gulf War, SFOR in Bosnia, and Operation Iraqi Freedom.

    Twenty-three of the Regiment’s troopers received the Medal of Honor, all awarded for gallantry in action between 1871 and 1898. The list includes William "Buffalo Bill" Cody, whose award was rescinded in 1916 for not being a member of the military. Cody's medal was reinstated in 1989.

    At present, the 3d Armored Cavalry Regiment is the only heavy armored cavalry regiment in the U.S. Army. The other two remaining armored cavalry regiments, the 2nd and 11th, are organized as brigade combat teams.

    Structure

    Structure 3rd Armored Cavalry (click to enlarge)Since the 3d Armored Cavalry Regiment is the last of the ACRs, its structure is unique. It has 3 Armored Cavalry and 1 Air Cavalry squadrons. Each Armored Cavalry squadron is divided into 3 Cavalry troops and 1 Armor company. Each cavalry troop is divided into 6 platoons: 2 scout platoons (with M3 Bradley Cavalry Fighting Vehicles), 2 tank platoons (with M1 Abrams Main Battle Tanks), a Fire Support Platoon, and Headquarters Platoon. The squadron's armor company consists purely of M1 tanks, serving as an armor reserve.

    Regimental Headquarters and Headquarters Troop "Remington"
    1st Squadron "Tiger"
    2nd Squadron "Sabre"
    3rd Squadron "Thunder"
    4th Squadron "Longknife" - Aviation Squadron
    Support Squadron "Muleskinner"
    [edit] Origins

    Top Left: Branch Insignia of the 3d ACR
    Top Right: Shoulder Sleeve Insignia of the 3d ACR
    Bottom Right: Distinctive Unit Insignia of the 3d ACR (nicknamed the "BUG")[edit] 1st Squadron ("Tiger")
    Tiger Squadron is currently organized as follows:

    Headquarters and Headquarters Troop ("Roughrider")
    A Troop ("Apache")
    B Troop ("Bandit")
    C Troop ("Crazyhorse")
    D Company ("Dragon")
    Howitzer Battery ("King")
    When the Regiment of Mounted Riflemen was organized pursuant to the act of Congress in 1846, the first companies filled were A, B, C, and D They would not be designated as troops until 1883 and would later make up the core of Tiger Squadron, 3d Armored Cavalry Regiment.

    Bandit Troop (then B Company) is the Regiment's senior troop. It was organized 1 August 1846, and consisted of 1-Captain, 1-1st Lieutenant, 1-2nd Lieutenant, 1-Brevet 2Lt, and 75 enlisted men. Crazyhorse Troop (then C Company) was organized next on 1 September 1846, with Captain Samuel H. Walker as its commander. He is listed as being "…on detached service at Washington, obtaining equipment and recruits for Company…" until 21 May 1847. No doubt the "equipment" he was obtaining was the shipment of 1000 Colt-Walker revolvers he had co-designed with Samuel Colt. Apache Troop (then A Company) completed its organization 1 October 1846. Captain William Wing Loring was the first Commander of A Company, and would later become the Regiment's 2nd Colonel, before resigning his commission to serve the Confederacy. Dragon Company (then D Company) was organized 4 October 1846 with 3 officers and 61 enlisted. Captain Henry Pope was the first commander of D company.

    The Regiment's first taste of combat would come in the United States' first international expeditionary war - The Mexican-American War of 1846–1848. Crazyhorse Troop lead General Scott's investment of the City of Vera Cruz. In so doing their first "victory" was the capture of a Mexican supply train of oxen laden with casks of wine. Cadet Dabney Maury of C Company:

    When our work for that day was done…We were very hungry and thirsty. So our Texas guide lassoed a fat beef, a keg of sherry was broached, and we bivouacked upon the northern beach of Vera Cruz, just beyond the cannon range of the city, and remained there until, after two or three weeks bombardment, Vera Cruz surrendered.

    Apache Troop suffered the Regiment's first enlisted and officer combat casualties. Private Timothy Cunningham was killed by a cannon ball during the siege of Vera Cruz on 11 March 1847. One month later on 18 April 1847, 1LT Thomas Ewell was killed in action at Cerro Gordo. As he died, General Scott knelt by him and "soothed his expiring moments" saying afterwards "Ewell fell sword in hand within the works."

    On 9 June 1847, a famous frontiersman is appointed as a Lieutenant of Rifles in Company C. However, because of his rugged independence and plain dealing with friend and foe, he fails to make the grade with Congress, which refuses to confirm his appointment. Christopher "Kit" Carson is carried on the rolls of Company C from May through December 1847 as " Not joined since appointment". It seems, therefore, that Tiger Squadron would have a claim on Fort Carson nearly 100 years before the post existed.

    2nd Squadron ("Sabre")
    Sabre Squadron is organized as follows:

    Headquarters and Headquarters Troop ("Rattler")
    E Troop ("Eagle")
    F Troop ("Fox")
    G Troop ("Grim")
    H Company ("Heavy")
    Howitzer Battery ("Lion")
    43rd Combat Engineer Company ("Sapper") (Regimental asset which falls under the administrative control of Sabre Squadron.) The 43rd CEC is organized as follows: Headquarters Platoon, 1st Platoon, 2nd Platoon, 3rd Platoon, Assault and Obstacle Platoon, Maintenance Platoon. During conventional combat operations, one sapper platoon plus a portion of the A&O platoon would be attached to each maneuver squadron. During Operation Iraqi Freedom, Sapper has been placed under the operational control of all three maneuver squadrons both at company and platoon levels.
    The Regiment of Mounted Riflemen was authorized by an Act of Congress on December 1, 1845 and the president signed the bill in law May 19, 1846. Thus came into existence a new organization in the United States Army: a regiment of riflemen, mounted to provide greater mobility than the Infantry and equipped with percussion rifles to provide greater range and more accurate firepower than the Infantry’s muskets or the Dragoon’s carbines. From the hills of central Mexico to the deserts of Iraq the 2nd Squadron has always been on the cutting edge of history.

    Through six campaigns of the Mexican War, 2nd Squadron distinguished itself. On 20 August 1847, General Winfield Scott, Commander of American Forces in Mexico, made the speech from which the first sixteen words have become so important to the Regiment. The Regiment laid bloodied and exhausted from the fierce fighting at Contreras. But even so, each man stood at attention as the General approached.

    General Scott, who had arrived to order the Regiment to Churubsco for an even more difficult battle, became so choked with emotion over the valor of these men, that he removed his hat, bowed low, and proclaimed: “Brave Rifles! Veterans! You have been baptized in fire and blood and have come out steel!” This accolade is emblazoned on the Regimental Coat of Arms, and it is still the source of the Regimental Motto, “Blood and Steel”.

    Today 2nd Squadron maintains its combat-ready posture through frequent field training exercises and semi-annual gunnery training, emphasizing proficiency at troop, platoon, section, and squad/crew levels. Command post exercises test the ability of the Squadron to react to situations which arise in combat. Although the Squadron’s training takes place in the local training area and environment, it is still expected to be able to move, shoot, and communicate in any climate and terrain throughout the world. Despite the many tasks that 2nd Squadron is called upon to perform, it stands ready, as it has for over 150 years, to perform any assigned mission.

    BRAVE RIFLES.....Sabre Ready!

    By Director, 3d Armored Cavalry Museum


    3rd Squadron ("Thunder")
    Thunder Squadron is organized as follows:

    Headquarters and Headquarters Troop ("Havoc Hounds")
    I Troop ("Ironhawk")
    K Troop ("Killer")
    L Troop ("Lightning")
    M Company ("Mad Dog")
    Howitzer Battery ("Regulator")
    66th Military Intelligence Company ("Ghostrider") (Regimental asset which falls under the administrative control of Thunder Squadron.)
    Through six campaigns of the Mexican War, 3rd Squadron distinguished itself. On 20 August 1847, General Winfield Scott, Commander of American Forces in Mexico, made the speech from which the first sixteen words have become so important to the Regiment. The Regiment laid bloodied and exhausted from the fierce fighting at Contreras. But even so, each man stood at attention as the General approached. General Scott, who had arrived to order the Regiment to Churubsco for an even more difficult battle, became so choked with emotion over the valor of these men, that he removed his hat, bowed low, and proclaimed: "Brave Rifles! Veterans! You have been baptized in fire and blood and have come out steel!" This accolade is emblazoned on the Regimental Coat of Arms, and it is still the source of the Regimental Motto, "Blood and Steel".

    The 3rd Squadron was the command of future GEN George S. Patton, Jr., who also served as the 28th commander of the regiment. 3rd Squadron also has seven Medal of Honor recipients throughout its history.

    The 3rd Squadron maintains its combat-ready posture through frequent field training exercises and semi-annual gunnery training, emphasizing proficiency at troop, platoon, section, and squad/crew levels. Command post exercises test the ability of the Squadron to react to situations which arise in combat. Although the Squadron's training takes place in the local training area and environment, it is still expected to be able to move, shoot, and communicate in any climate and terrain throughout the world.

    The 3rd Squadron is currently known as "Task Force Thunder" and operates in the Northern province of Nineva, Iraq.

    4th Squadron ("Longknife")
    Longknife Squadron is organized as follows:

    Headquarters and Headquarters Troop ("Headhunters")
    N Troop ("Nomad") - AH-64D Apache Longbow attack helicopters (OH-58D until July 2006)
    O Troop ("Outlaw") - AH-64D Apache Longbow attack helicopters (OH-58D until July 2006)
    P Troop ("Pegasus") - AH-64D Apache Longbow attack helicopters (OH-58D until July 2006)
    Q Troop ("Quicksilver") - AH-64A deactivated 2004, reactivated as Quickstrike (2005), deactivated in 2006, reactivated in 2007 as "Quicksilver" Shadow UAV Troop
    R Troop ("Renegade") - Forward Support Troop (FST)(AH-64D until 2006)
    S Troop ("Stetson") - UH-60L Blackhawk utility helicopters
    T Troop ("Tomahawk") - Aviation Unit Maintenance
    AVIM Troop ("Air Raiders") - Aviation Intermediate Maintenance
    The 4th Squadron, 3d Armored Cavalry Regiment, originated from the Aviation section assigned to the regiment while stationed at Happstadten, Germany in 1961. In July 1968, the 3rd ACR, with the aviation section, redeployed to the United States and was stationed at Fort Lewis, Washington.

    The Regiment, along with the Aviation section and a recently formed Air Cavalry Troop, relocated from Fort Lewis, Washington to Fort Bliss, Texas in 1972. In 1982, the aviation section was consolidated and re-designated the Regimental Support Aviation Troop (RSAT) which, along with the Air Cavalry Troop (ACT), provided the Regiment with airborne command and control, troop lift, aerial resupply, and medical evacuation capabilities.

    The ACT and RSAT were combined in December 1985 to form the 3rd combat Aviation Squadron (Provisional). This provisional squadron first demonstrated its contribution to the Regimental Combined Arms Team during a rotation to the National Training Center in 1987. The following year, the squadron deployed to REFORGER to participate in the last REFORGER exercise prior to the collapse of the Berlin Wall in 1989.

    The squadron was officially activated as the 4th Squadron, 3d ACR in October 1988. It consisted of Headquarters and Headquarters Troop (HHT), three Air Cavalry Troops (N, O, P), two Attack Troops (Q and R), and Assault Troop (S), and an Aviation Maintenance Troop (T). Within these organizations, the squadron was equipped with the AH-1 Cobra Attack Helicopter, the OH-58A/C Kiowa Helicopter, and the UH-60 Blackhawk Helicopter.

    In September 1990, the squadron deployed to Saudi Arabia as part of Operation Desert Shield and established Longknife Base Camp in north central Saudi Arabia. On the morning of 24 February 1991, the squadron crossed the border into Iraq and commenced offensive operations in support of the regiment, attacking deep into Iraqi territory, moving more than 350 kilometers in less than 72 hours. Upon the Coalition Forces' victory, the squadron redeployed to Fort Bliss, Texas in March 1991.

    In late 1995, the Squadron initiated its relocation from Fort Bliss to Fort Carson, Colorado. In December 1995, the two Attack Troops (Q and R) were deactivated and their OH-58A/C and AH-1 aircraft were turned in. On 15 January 1996, the two Attack Troops were reactivated and equipped with the AH-64 Apache Attack Helicopter. The relocation to Fort Carson, Colorado was completed in March 1996.

    The 571st Medical Company (Air Ambulance) was assigned to the squadron in August 1996 with 15 additional UH-60 Blackhawk aircraft. With the addition of the 571st, the squadron grew to a total of 83 combat aircraft and 700 Troopers, the largest aviation squadron/battalion in the United States Army. As of 2006, 571st Medical Company is no longer with Longknife Squadron.

    The squadron continued its Attack, Air Cavalry, Assault, Electronic Warfare and Medevac missions in support of the regiment and the Mountain Post not only at home station, but also during recent deployments to the National Training Center, Pinon Canyon Maneuver Site, Operation Green Flag (Nellis, AFB), Operation Northern Edge (Alaska), Operation Intrinsic Action (Kuwait), Medevac support to Joint Task Force Sic, Fort Bliss, Texas; and Fort Riley, Kansas and to wildland firefighting contingencies throughout the Western United States.

    In October 1998, the squadron transferred all remaining OH-58A/C and AH-1 aircraft and was modernized with 24 OH-58D Kiowa Warriors. This reorganization under the Army Restructuring Initiative will again distinguish the squadron as the only squadron or battalion in the active force equipped with AH-64, UH-60A/L, and OH-58D aircraft.

    In 2005, during OIF III, Quicksilver Troop was re-designated "Quickstrike," and served as the Regiment's light reconnaissance troop with air-mobile capability. Additionally, Q Troop partnered with an Iraqi Army brigade and helped start the 3rd IA Division's Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) company.

    In 2006, Longknife Squadron was deactivated during the Regiment's move to Fort Hood, Texas. During the summer of 2006, 3d ACR moved to Ft. Hood Texas, leaving portions of Longknife Squadron at Ft. Carson, CO. The three OH-58D Air Cavalry Troops, Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, the FST and portions of the AVIM and AVUM (specific to OH58 maintenance) remained at Ft. Carson and reflagged as 1/6 CAV. Upon the Regiment's arrival at Ft. Hood, TX, 1-1 Aviation (located at Ft. Hood fielding the AH-64D Longbow) reflagged as 4th Squadron 3d ACR, changing the makeup and capabilities of 4th Squadron. N, O and P troops no longer possess the OH-58 Kiowa Warrior and are now outfitted with AH-64D Apache Longbows. R troop is no longer the attack troop and is now the Forward Support Troop. S troop remains the UH-60L Blackhawk Troop. T troop is still the Aviation Unit level Maintenance (AVUM) Troop. Upon the reflag, Longknife gained an Aviation Intermediate Maintenance (AVIM) Troop which was previously organized under the Regimental Support Squadron (RSS) - making 4th Squadron 3d ACR a unique and extremely flexible Air Cavalry Squadron.

    The squadron is an integral component of the regiment's combined arms team and is prepared for worldwide deployment in support of the Regiment of Mounted Riflemen.

    Support Squadron ("Muleskinner")
    Muleskinner Squadron is organized as follows:

    Headquarters and Headquarters Troop ("Bullwhip")
    Supply and Transportation Troop ("Packhorse")
    Maintenance Troop ("Blacksmith")
    Medical Troop ("Scalpel")
    89th Chemical Company ("Chemdawg") (Regimental asset which falls under the administrative control of Muleskinner Squadron.)
    Support Squadron, 3d Armored Cavalry Regiment was formed on the 11th of November 1977, on the order of the 57th Colonel of the Regiment, Colonel C. Lutz, and given the mission of executing logistical operations for the 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment. Support Squadron promptly adopted the nickname "Muleskinner" from the original teamsters who conducted logistical operations by wagon trains for the Regiment of Mounted Riflemen during its early years.

    During Operation Iraqi Freedom Three (OIF III) the 89th Chemical Company, led by Captain Fennel for the first ten months of the deployment and First Sergeant Michael Shirley, oversaw detention operations at the Regimental Internment Facility (RIF), safeguarding and segregating over 2000 detainees. Further the unit's reconnaissance platoon traveled over 20,000 miles (32,000 km) as they conducted escort operations for the Muleskinner Logistical Convoys. The final two months of the deployment, Captain Brian Caplin took command of 89th and redeployed the company back to the states after a successful OIF deployment.

    Medical Troop was commanded by Captain Dan Liedl throughout the operation; missions encompassed several mass casualty events and medical evacuations, along with medical coverage at the Regiment's displaced civilian facility during Operation Restoring Rights and on-site medical coverage at the Regimental Internment Facility. Maintenance Troop, commanded by Captain Jon Reeves conducted a multitude of tasks including Forward Operating Base gate security, continued maintenance operations, enabling the success of the regiment during Operation Restoring Rights and conducted Iraqi Police training and partnership operations. Supply and Transportation Troop lead by James Outland moved thousands of pounds of ammunition, fuel and food to the maneuver units allowing sustained operations. sgt bakeman is part of the 3d ACR RSS who was part of the deployment is now back state side as a team leader for HET squad.

    Definition from Wikipedia

    OFFICIAL 3rd ACR WEBSITE
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    Post by AndrewA74 on Tue Sep 29, 2009 7:53 pm

    3rd ACR Patches. From left to right:

    Row 1: Color, Subdued, Desert
    Row 2: Desert Theatre Made in Kuwait

    3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment (ACR) 3rdACR

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    Post by AndrewA74 on Sat Oct 31, 2009 2:36 pm

    3rd ACR on Desert Velcro. Possibly for flight suit, Modified DCU, or CCU?
    3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment (ACR) P1060266
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    Post by AndrewA74 on Sat Nov 21, 2009 10:10 pm

    ACU on Velcro, US Made, Merrowed Edged
    3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment (ACR) AAA61

    (Courtesy of Panzerwerk)

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