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    UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES DECORATIONS AND DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DECORATIONS

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    Post by memphismeister on Sun Aug 23, 2009 7:20 pm

    MEDAL OF HONOR
    UNITED STATES ARMY


    Description: A gold five pointed star, each point tipped with trefoils, 1 ½ inches wide, surrounded by a green laurel wreath and suspended from a gold bar inscribed "VALOR", surmounted by an eagle. In the center of the star, Minerva’s head surrounded by the words "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA." On each ray of the star is a green oak leaf. On the reverse is a bar engraved "THE CONGRESS TO" with a space for engraving the name of the recipient.

    Medal of Honor Ribbon

    Ribbon: The medal is suspended by a neck ribbon, 1 3/8 inches wide, Bluebird 67117. A shield of the same color ribbon with thirteen White (67101) stars, arranged in the form of three chevrons is above the medal. The service ribbon is 1/38 inches wide with five White stars in the form of a "M".

    Criteria: The Medal of Honor is awarded by the President, in the name of Congress, to a person who, while a member of the Army, distinguishes himself or herself conspicuously by gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his or her life above and beyond the call of duty while engaged in action against an enemy of the United States; while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force; or while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party. The deed performed must have been one of personal bravery or self-sacrifice so conspicuous as to clearly distinguish the individual above his or her comrades and must have involved risk of life. Incontestable proof of the performance of the service will be exacted and each recommendation for the award of this decoration will be considered on the standard of extraordinary merit.

    Background:

    a. General George Washington had created the Badge of Military Merit on 7 August 1792 but it had fallen into disuse after the Revolutionary War. Decorations, as such, were still too closely related to European royalty to be of concern to the American people. However, the fierce fighting and deeds of valor during the Civil War brought into focus the realization that such valor must be recognized. Legislation was introduced in the Senate on 17 February 1862, which authorized the medal for the Army and followed the pattern of a similar award approved for Naval personnel in December 1861. The Resolution provided that: "The President of the United States be, and he is hereby, authorized to cause two thousand "medals of honor" to be prepared with suitable emblematic devices, and to direct that the same be presented, in the name of Congress, to such noncommissioned officers and privates as shall most distinguish themselves by their gallantry in action, and other soldier-like qualities during the present insurrection, and the sum of ten thousand dollars be, and the same is hereby appropriated out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the purpose of carrying this resolution into effect."

    b. The original design for the Army was created by Christian Schussel and engraved by Anthony C. Pacquot. The pendant was identical to the design approved by the Navy, with the exception of the suspension and clasp. It consisted of a five-pointed star, tipped with trefoils containing a crown of laurel and oak. In the middle, a band of 34 stars represented the number of States in 1862. Minerva, personifying the United States, stands with a left hand resting on fasces and right hand holding a shield blazoned with the United States arms. She repulses Discord, represented by snakes. The pendant was suspended by a trophy of crossed cannons, balls, sword and an American eagle. The clasp was two cornucopias and the arms of the United States.

    c. The initial law was amended by an Act of Congress on 3 March 1863 to extend its provisions to include officers.

    d. In 1896, misuse of the medal led to a change in the design of the ribbon because the original had been imitated by nonmilitary organizations. This change was authorized by Joint Resolution of Congress, Fifty-Fourth Congress, Sess. I, 2 May 1896. At this time a bowknot (rosette) was adopted to be worn in lieu of the medal. The ribbon and bowknot (rosette), established and prescribed by the President, was promulgated in War Department Orders dated 10 November 1896.
    e. On 23 April 1904, Congress authorized a new design of the medal. The design adopted at that time was designed by Major General George L. Gillespie and is the one currently in use. The medal was worn either suspended from the neck or pinned over the left breast in precedence to other military decorations.
    f. The present neck ribbon was adopted in 1944. It is worn outside the shirt collar and inside the coat, hanging above all other decorations.
    g. Special entitlements for recipients of the Medal of Honor include:
    1) Each Medal of Honor awardee may have his name entered on the Medal of Honor Roll (38 USC 560). Each person whose name is placed on the Medal of Honor Roll is certified to the Department of Veterans Affairs as being entitled to receive the special pension of $400 per month.
    (2) Enlisted recipients of the Medal of Honor are entitled to a supplemental uniform allowance.
    (3) Special entitlements to air transportation under the provisions of DOD Regulation 4515.13-R.
    (4) Identification card, commissary and exchange privileges for Medal of Honor recipients and their eligible dependents.
    (5) Children of recipients are eligible for admission to the U.S. Service Academies without regard to the quota requirements.
    (6) Ten percent increase in retired pay under Title 10, USC 3991, subject to the 75% limit on total retired pay. UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES DECORATIONS AND DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DECORATIONS Mohmedalar
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    UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES DECORATIONS AND DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DECORATIONS Empty DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS

    Post by memphismeister on Sun Aug 23, 2009 7:44 pm

    1. Description: A cross of bronze, 2 inches in height and 1 13/16 inches in width with an eagle on the center and a scroll below the eagle bearing the inscription "FOR VALOR". On the reverse side, the center of the cross is circled by a wreath with a space for engraving the name of the recipient.

    2. Ribbon: The ribbon is 1 3/8 inches wide and consists of the following stripes: 1/8 inch Old Glory Red 67156; 1/16 inch White 67101; 1 inch Imperial Blue 67175; 1 1/16 inch White; and 1/8 inch Old Glory Red.

    3. CRITERIA: The Distinguished Service Cross is awarded to a person who, while serving in any capacity with the Army, distinguishes himself or herself by extraordinary heroism not justifying the award of a Medal of Honor; while engaged in an action against an enemy of the Unites States; while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing/foreign force; or while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing Armed Force in which the United States is not a belligerent party. The act or acts of heroism must have been so notable and have involved risk of life so extraordinary as to set the individual apart from his or her comrades.

    4. Components: The following are authorized components of the Distinguished Service Cross:
    a. Decoration (regular size): MIL-D-3943/4. NSN 8455-00-269-5745 for decoration set. NSN 8455-00-246-3827 for individual replacement medal.
    b. Decoration (miniature size): MIL-D-3943/4. NSN 8455-00-996-50007.
    c. Ribbon: MIL-R-11589/50. NSN 8455-00-252-9919.
    d. Lapel Button (metal replica of ribbon bar): MIL-L-11484/1. NSN 8455-00-253-0808.

    5. BACKGROUND:
    a. The Distinguished Service Cross was established by President Woodrow Wilson on January 2, 1918. General Pershing, Commander-in-Chief of the Expeditionary Forces in France, had recommended that recognition other than the Medal of Honor, be authorized for the Armed Forces of the United States for service rendered, in like manner, to that awarded by the European Armies. The request for establishment of the medal was forwarded from the Secretary of War to the President in a letter dated December 28, 1917. The Act of Congress establishing this award (193-65th Congress) dated July 9, 1918 is contained in Title 10 United States Code (USC) 3742. The establishment of the Distinguished Service Cross was promulgated in War Department General Order No. 6, dated January 12, 1918.
    b. The first design of the Distinguished Service Cross was cast and manufactured by the United States Mint at Philadelphia. The die was cast from the approved design prepared by Lieutenant Aymar E. Embry, Engineers Officer Reserve Corps. Upon examination of the first medals struck at the Mint, it was considered advisable to make certain minor changes to add to the beauty and the attractiveness of the medal. Due to the importance of the time element involved in furnishing the decorations to General Pershing, one hundred of the medals were struck from the original design and numbered 1 to 100. These medals were furnished with the provision that these crosses be replaced when the supply of the second design was accomplished which would also be numbered 1 to 100.
    c. Title 10, USC 3991, provides for a 10% increase in retired pay for enlisted personnel who have retired with more than 20 years of service if they have been awarded the Distinguished Service Cross.
    d. Order of precedence and wear of decorations is contained in Army Regulation (AR) 670-1. Policy for awards, approving authority, supply, and issue of decorations is contained in AR 600-8-22.


    UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES DECORATIONS AND DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DECORATIONS DistinguishedServiceCross
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    UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES DECORATIONS AND DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DECORATIONS Empty DEFENSE DISTINGUISHED SERVICE MEDAL

    Post by memphismeister on Sun Aug 23, 2009 8:12 pm

    DEFENSE DISTINGUISHED SERVICE MEDAL

    Description. Obverse: A gold color metal and enamel pendant 1 7/8 inches (4.76cm) in height overall consisting of a medium blue pentagon point up superimposed by a gold eagle with outspread wings charged on its breast with the shield of the United States and grasping in its talons three crossed arrows (as depicted on the seal of the Department of Defense) all gold, the wings projecting over and surmounting a gold arc encircling the top and sides of the pentagon and bearing nine conjoined gold stars above the wings, and two on each side below the wings, terminating in a gold wreath encircling the base composed of a laurel branch on the left and an olive branch on the right, the wreath surmounted by the extended ends of the arrows in base; at the top of the pendant a group of five graduated gold rays extending above the stars.

    Reverse: On an arc at the top the inscription "For Distinguished Service" above the pentagon which bears the inscription "From The Secretary of Defense To", all in gold.

    Symbolism: The pentagon refers to the five armed services, the Army, Marine Corps, Navy, Coast Guard (in time of war) and Air Force. It also alludes to the headquarters of the Department of Defense. The configuration of the eagle bearing the shield of the United States and grasping three arrows upon a medium blue background together with an arc of thirteen stars and wreath of laurel and olive refers to the seal of the Department of Defense and indicates the award of the medal in the name of the Secretary of Defense. The conjoined stars and gold rays signify unity and excellence in the performance of the mission of the Department of Defense on behalf of the Nation.

    Ribbon:
    A ribbon 1 3/8 inches (3.49cm) in width composed of the following vertical stripes: Bluebird 3/8 inch (.95cm), Golden Yellow 1/4 inch (.64cm), Scarlet 1/8 inch (.32cm), Golden Yellow 1/4 inch (.64cm), Bluebird 3/8 (.95cm) inch.

    Symbolism: Bluebird is the color associated with the Department Defense. Yellow signifies excellence and the knowledge and guidance provided by great achievement. Red connotes zeal and courageous action.

    Background:
    a. Authorized by E.O. July 9, 1970.
    b. The Defense Distinguished Service Medal (DDSM) shall only be awarded to officers of the Armed Forces of the United States whose exceptional performance of duty and contributions to national security or defense have been at the highest levels. Such officers have direct and ultimate responsibility for a major activity or program that significantly influences the policies of the U.S. Government. Only under the most unusual circumstances will the DDSM be awarded as an impact award for outstanding TDY achievement. The DDSM is specifically intended to recognize exceptionally distinguished service and to honor an individual's accomplishments over a sustained period.
    (1) Normally, such broad responsibilities shall be held by only the most senior officers whose duties bring them into direct and frequent contact with the Secretary of Defense and the other senior officials within the Government. Examples of such positions are the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Chiefs and the Vice Chiefs of the Military Services, including the Commandant and the Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps; and the CINCs and the Deputy CINCs of the Unified Combatant Commands.
    (2) The DDSM also may be awarded to other senior officers who serve in positions of great responsibility, or to an officer whose direct and individual contributions to national security or defense are recognized as being so exceptional in scope and value as to be equivalent to contributions normally associated with positions encompassing broader responsibilities.
    c. The DDSM, as the highest Defense decoration, may only be awarded by the Secretary of Defense. Under no circumstances may the awarding authority be delegated.
    d. The DDSM shall be placed in precedence after the MOH and the Distinguished Service Crosses of the Armed Forces, but before the Distinguished Service Medals of the Armed Forces.
    e. All recommendations for award of the DDSM to the members of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, or the Unified Combatant Command Headquarters or activities reporting to or through the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, shall be processed through the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, for recommendation. The recommendations shall not be boarded at the Joint Staff level. The Director, Joint Staff, for the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, shall forward his recommendations to the Chief, Military Personnel Division, Personnel and Security Directorate, WHS, for boarding and processing. Recommendations should be submitted to arrive at the Joint Staff no later than 90 days before the desired presentation date.
    f. All other recommendations for award of the DDSM shall be submitted to the Chief, Military Personnel Division, Personnel and Security Directorate, Washington Headquarters Services (WHS), for boarding and processing. Recommendations should be submitted to the WHS no later than 90 days before the desired presentation date.
    UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES DECORATIONS AND DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DECORATIONS Ddsm11
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    UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES DECORATIONS AND DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DECORATIONS Empty DISTINGUISHED SERVICE MEDAL

    Post by memphismeister on Sun Aug 23, 2009 9:15 pm

    DISTINGUISHED SERVICE MEDAL

    1. Description: The Coat of Arms of the United States in Gold surrounded by a circle of Dark Blue enamel, 1 ½ inches in diameter, bearing the inscription "FOR DISTINGUISHED SERVICE MCMXVIII". On the reverse is a scroll for the name of the recipient (which is to be engraved) upon a trophy of flags and weapons. The medal is suspended by a bar attached to the ribbon.

    2. Ribbon: The ribbon is 1 3/8 inches wide and consists of the following stripes: 5/16 inch Scarlet 67111; 1/16 inch Ultramarine Blue 67118; 5/8 inch White 67101; 1/16 inch Ultramarine Blue; and 5/16 inch Scarlet.

    3. Criteria: The Distinguished Service Medal is awarded to any person who, while serving in any capacity with the United States Army, has distinguished himself or herself by exceptionally meritorious service to the Government in a duty of great responsibility. The performance must be such as to merit recognition for service which is clearly exceptional. Exceptional performance of normal duty will not alone justify an award of this decoration.
    a. For service not related to actual war, the term "duty of a great responsibility" applies to a narrower range of positions, than in time of war, and requires evidence of conspicuously significant achievement. However, justification of the award may accrue by virtue of exceptionally meritorious service in a succession of high positions of great importance.
    b. Awards may be made to persons other than members of the Armed Forces of the United States for wartime services only, and then only under exceptional circumstances, with the express approval of the President in each case.

    4. Components: The following are authorized components of the Distinguished Service Medal and applicable specifications:
    a. Decoration (regular size): MIL-D-3943/7. NSN for decoration set: 8455-00-444-0007. NSN for replacement medal is 8455-00-246-3830.
    b. Decoration (miniature size): MIL-D-3943/7. NSN 8455-00-996-5008.
    c. Ribbon: MIL-R-11589/52. NSN 8455-00-252-9922.
    d. Lapel Button (metal replica of ribbon bar): MIL-L-11484/4. NSN 8455-00-253-0809.

    5. Background:
    a. The Distinguished Service Medal was authorized by Presidential Order dated January 2, 1918, and confirmed by Congress on July 9, 1918. It was announced by War Department General Order No. 6, January 12, 1918, with the following information concerning the medal: "A bronze medal of appropriate design and a ribbon to be worn in lieu thereof, to be awarded by the President to any person who, while serving in any capacity with the Army shall hereafter distinguish himself or herself, or who, since April 6, 1917, has distinguished himself or herself by exceptionally meritorious service to the Government in a duty of great responsibility in time of war or in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United States." The Act of Congress on July 9, 1918, recognized the need for different types and degrees of heroism and meritorious service and included such provisions for award criteria. The current statutory authorization for the Distinguished Service Medal is Title 10, United States Code, Section 3743.
    b. Among the first awards of the Distinguished Service Medal for service in World War I, were those to the Commanding Officers of the Allied Armies: Marshals Foch and Joffre, General Petain of France, Field Marshal Haig of Great Britain, General Diaz of Italy, General Gillain of Belgium, and General Pershing.
    c. Order of precedence and wear of decorations is contained in Army Regulation 670-1. Policy for awards, approving authority, supply, and issue of decorations is contained in AR 600-8-22.

    UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES DECORATIONS AND DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DECORATIONS Armyds10
    UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES DECORATIONS AND DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DECORATIONS Armyds11
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    UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES DECORATIONS AND DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DECORATIONS Empty SILVER STAR

    Post by memphismeister on Sun Aug 23, 2009 9:21 pm

    SILVER STAR

    1. Description: A Gold star, 1 ½ inches in circumscribing diameter with a laurel wreath encircling rays from the center and a 3/16 inch diameter silver star superimposed in the center. The pendant is suspended from a rectangular shaped metal loop with rounded corners. The reverse has the inscription "FOR GALLANTRY IN ACTION".

    2. Ribbon: The ribbon is 1 3/8 inches wide and consists of the following stripes: 3/32 inch Ultramarine Blue 67118; 3/64 inch White 67101; 7/32 inch Ultramarine Blue; 7/32 inch White; 7/32 inch Old Glory Red 67156 (center stripe); 7/32 inch White; 7/32 inch Ultramarine Blue; 3/64 inch White; and 3/32 inch Ultramarine Blue.

    3. Criteria: The Silver Star is awarded to a person who, while serving in any capacity with the U.S. Army, is cited for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force, or while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party. The required gallantry, while of a lesser degree than that required for award of the Distinguished Service Cross, must nevertheless have been performed with marked distinction. Soldiers who received a citation for gallantry in action during World War I may apply to have the citation converted to the Silver Star Medal.

    4. Components: The following are authorized components of the Silver Star Medal:

    a. Decoration (regular size): MIL-D-3943/11. NSN for decoration set: 8455-00-269-5758. Individual medal: 8455-00-246-3834.

    b. Decoration (miniature size): MIL-D-3943/11. NSN 8455-00-996-5013.

    c. Ribbon: MIL-R-11589/136. NSN 8455-00-252-9953.

    d. Lapel Button: MIL-L-11484/9. NSN 8455-00-253-0819.

    5. Background: a. The Citation Star was established as a result of an Act of Congress on July 9, 1918 (65th Congress, Sess II, Chapter 143, page 873) and was promulgated in War Department Bulletin No. 43 dated 1918. It was retroactive to include those cited for gallantry in action in previous campaigns back to the Spanish-American War. Per letter from General Jervey, Office of the Chief of Staff, dated February 26, 1926, is quoted in part: The Secretary of War directs as follows - The following is the amended version of paragraph 187 of Army Regulation: "No more than one Medal of Honor or one Distinguished Service Cross or one Distinguished Service Medal shall be issued to any one person, but for each succeeding or act sufficient to justify the award of a Medal of Honor or Distinguished Service Cross or Distinguished Service Medal, respectively, a bronze oak leaf cluster, shall be issued in lieu thereof; and for each citation of an officer or enlisted man for gallantry in action, published in orders from headquarters of a force commanded by a general officer, not warranting the issue of a Medal of Honor, Distinguished Service Cross or Distinguished Service Medal, he shall wear a silver star, 3/16 inch in diameter, as prescribed in Uniform Regulations." Army Regulation 600-40, paragraph 48, September 27, 1921, specified that the Citation Star would be worn above the clasp, on the ribbon of the service medal for the campaign for service in which the citations were given.

    b. On July 19, 1932, the Secretary of War approved the Silver Star medal to replace the Citation Star. This design placed the Citation Star on a bronze pendant suspended from the ribbon design. The star was no longer attached to a service or campaign ribbon.

    c. Authorization for the Silver Star was placed into law by an Act of Congress for the Navy on August 7, 1942 and an Act of Congress for the Army on December 15, 1942. The primary reason for congressional authorization was the desire to award the medal to civilians as well as the Army. The current statutory authorization for the Silver Star Medal is Title 10, United States Code, Section 3746.

    d. Order of precedence and wear of decorations is contained in Army Regulation 670-1. Policy for awards, approving authority, supply, and issue of decorations is contained in Army Regulation 600-8-22.


    UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES DECORATIONS AND DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DECORATIONS Silver10
    UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES DECORATIONS AND DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DECORATIONS Silver11
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    UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES DECORATIONS AND DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DECORATIONS Empty DEFENSE SUPERIOR SERVICE MEDAL

    Post by memphismeister on Sun Aug 23, 2009 9:30 pm

    DEFENSE SUPERIOR SERVICE MEDAL

    Description. Obverse: A silver color metal and enamel pendant 1 7/8 inches (4.76cm) in height overall consisting of a medium blue pentagon point up superimposed by a silver eagle with outspread wings charged on its breast with the shield of the United States and grasping in its talons three crossed arrows (as depicted on the seal of the Department of Defense) all silver, the wings projecting over and surmounting a silver arc encircling the top and sides of the pentagon and bearing nine conjoined silver stars above the wings, and two on each side below the wings, terminating in a silver wreath encircling the base composed of a laurel branch on the left and an olive branch on the right, the wreath surmounted by the extended ends of the arrows in base; at the top of the pendant a group of five graduated silver rays extending above the stars.

    Reverse: On an arc at the top the inscription "For Superior Service" above the pentagon which bears the inscription "From The Secretary of Defense To", all silver.

    Symbolism: The pentagon refers to the five armed services, the Army, Marine Corps, Navy, Coast Guard (in time of war) and Air Force. It also alludes to the headquarters of the Department of Defense. The configuration of the eagle bearing the shield of the United States and grasping three arrows upon a medium blue background together with an arc of thirteen stars and wreath of laurel and olive refers to the seal of the Department of Defense and indicates the award of the medal in the name of the Secretary of Defense. The conjoined stars and silver rays signify unity and excellence in the performance of the mission of the Department of Defense on behalf of the Nation.

    Ribbon: A ribbon 1 3/8 inch (3.49cm) in width composed of the following vertical stripes: Golden Yellow 3/16 inch (.48cm), Bluebird 1/4 inch (.64cm), White 3/16 inch (.48cm), Scarlet 1/8 inch (.32cm), White 3/16 inch (.48cm), Bluebird 1/4 inch (.64cm) Golden Yellow 3/16 inch (.48cm).

    Background:
    a. Authorized by E.O. 11904, February 6, 1976.
    b. The Defense Superior Service Medal (DSSM) shall be awarded only to members of the Armed Forces of the United States who, after February 6, 1976, rendered superior meritorious service in a position of significant responsibility. Only under the most unusual circumstances will DSSM be awarded as an impact award for outstanding TDY achievement. The DSSM is specifically intended to recognize exceptionally superior service, and to honor an individual's accomplishments over a sustained period.
    c. The DSSM shall be awarded only by the Secretary of Defense.
    (1) The Director, Joint Staff, for the Chairman of the Joints Chiefs of Staff has been delegated approval or disapproval authority for Service members assigned to the Joint Staff, and those Service members assigned to Joint organizations. That authority may not be delegated further.
    (2) Approval or disapproval authority for all other qualifying Service members is delegated to the DA&M, OSD, for the ASD (FMP). The authority may not be delegated further.
    d. The DSSM shall be placed in precedence after the MOH, the Distinguished Service Crosses of the Services, the DDSM, the Distinguished Service Medals of the Services, and the Silver Star, but before the Legion of Merit.
    e. Recommendations approved by the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff shall be processed entirely by the Joint Staff. All other recommendations shall be forwarded to the Chief, Military Personnel Division, Personnel and Security Directorate, WHS, for processing. Recommendations should be submitted no later than 90 days before desired presentation date.

    UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES DECORATIONS AND DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DECORATIONS Dssm10UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES DECORATIONS AND DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DECORATIONS Dssm_b10
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    UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES DECORATIONS AND DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DECORATIONS Empty Legion of Merit

    Post by memphismeister on Sun Aug 23, 2009 9:37 pm

    Legion of Merit
    1. Description: The degrees of the Legion of Merit are as depicted below with description and components for each:
    CHIEF COMMANDER
    a. Chief Commander:
    1) Description: On a wreath of Green laurel joined at the bottom by a Gold bow-knot (rosette), a domed five-pointed White star bordered Crimson, points reversed with v-shaped extremities tipped with a Gold ball. In the center, a Blue disk encircled by Gold clouds, with 13 White stars arranged in the pattern that appears on the United States Coat of Arms. Between each point, within the wreath are crossed arrows pointing outwards. The overall width is 2 15/16 inches. The words "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" are engraved in the center of the reverse. A miniature of the decoration in Gold on a horizontal Gold bar is worn on the service ribbon.
    (2) Components: Decoration breast badge, MIL-D-3943/12, NSN for complete decoration set is 8455-00-269-5752; NSN for individual decoration set is 8455-00-246-3821. The specification for the service ribbon is MIL-R-11589/80 and the NSN is 8455-00-252-9925. The lapel button is MIL-L-11484/10-1, NSN is 8455-00-253-0813.
    COMMANDER
    b. Commander:
    (1) Description: On a wreath of Green laurel joined at the bottom by a Gold bow-knot (rosette), a five-pointed White star bordered Crimson, points reversed with v-shaped extremities tipped with a Gold ball. In the center, a Blue disk encircled by Gold clouds, with 13 White stars arranged in the pattern that appears on the United States Coat of Arms. Between each star point, within the wreath are crossed arrows pointing outwards. The overall width is 2 1/4 inches. A Gold laurel wreath in the v-shaped angle at the top connects an oval suspension ring to the neck ribbon that is 1 15/16 inches in width. The reverse of the five-pointed star is enameled in White, and the border is Crimson. In the center, a disk for engraving the name of the recipient surrounded by the words "ANNUIT COEPTIS MDCCLXXXII." An outer scroll contains the words "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA." The service ribbon is the same as the ribbon for the degree of Commander, except the ribbon attachment is Silver.
    (2) Components: The decoration set for degree of Commander consists of the decoration, service ribbon and lapel button and is NSN 8455-00-269-5753. Individual components are the decoration, MIL-D-3943/14, NSN 8455-00-246-3819; the service ribbon, MIL-R-11589/80, NSN 8455-00-252-9928; and the lapel button, MIL-L-11484/10-2, NSN 8455-00-253-0814. The neck ribbon for the degree of Commander is 1 15/16 inches wide and consists of the following stripes: 1/16 inch White 67101; center 1 13/16 inches Crimson 67112; and 1/16 inch White.
    OFFICER
    c. Officer:
    (1) Description: The design is the same as the degree of Commander except overall width is 1 7/8 inches and the pendant has a suspension ring instead of the wreath for attaching the ribbon. A Gold replica of the medal, 3/4 inch wide, is centered on the suspension ribbon.
    (2) Components. The decoration set for degree of Officer consists of the decoration, service ribbon and lapel button and is NSN 8455-00-269-5754. Individual components are the regular size decoration, MIL-D-3943/13, NSN 8455-00-246-3823; the service ribbon, MIL-R-11589/80, NSN 8455-00-252-9936; and the lapel button, MIL-L-11484/10-3, NSN 8455-00-257-4307. The miniature decoration, MIL-D-3943/13, is not part of the set but is stocked separately, NSN 8455-00-996-5010.
    LEGIONNAIRE AND LEGION OF MERIT
    d. Legionnaire/Legion of Merit:
    (1) Description: The design is the same as the degree of Officer, except the suspension ribbon does not have the medal replica.
    (2) Components: The decoration set for degree of Legionnaire and the Legion of Merit issued to U.S. personnel consists of the decoration, service ribbon and lapel button and is NSN 8455-00-262-3469. Individual components are the regular size decoration, MIL-D-3943/13, NSN 8455-00-246-3832; the service ribbon, MIL-R-11589/80, NSN 8455-00-252-9932; and the lapel button, MIL-L-11484/10-4, NSN 8455-00-257-4306. The miniature decoration, MIL-D-3943/13, is not part of the set but is stocked separately, NSN 8455-00-996-5009.
    2. Ribbon: The ribbon for the decorations is 1 3/8 inches wide and consists of the following stripes: 1/16 inch White 67101; center 1 1/4 inches Crimson 67112; and 1/16 inch White.
    3. Criteria: a. The degrees of Chief Commander, Commander, Officer, and Legionnaire are awarded only to members of armed forces of foreign nations under the criteria outlined in Army Regulation 672-7 and is based on the relative rank or position of the recipient as follows:
    (1) Chief Commander - Chief of State or Head of Government.
    (2) Commander - Equivalent of an U.S. military Chief of Staff or higher position but not to Chief of State.
    (3) Officer - General of Flag Officer below the equivalent of a U.S. military Chief of Staff; Colonel or equivalent rank for service in assignments equivalent to those normally held by a General or Flag Officer in U.S. military service; or Military Attaches.
    (4) Legionnaire - All recipients not included above.
    b. The Legion of Merit is awarded to all members of the Armed Forces of the United States without reference to degree for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services and achievements. The performance must have been such as to merit recognition of key individuals for service rendered in a clearly exceptional manner. Performance of duties normal to the grade, branch, specialty or assignment, and experience of an individual is not an adequate basis for this award. For service not related to actual war the term "key individual" applies to a narrower range of positions than in time of war and requires evidence of significant achievement. In peacetime, service should be in the nature of a special requirement or of an extremely difficult duty performed in an unprecedented and clearly exceptional manner. However, justification of the award may accrue by virtue of exceptionally meritorious service in a succession of important positions.

    4. Background: a. Although recommendations for creation of a Meritorious Service Medal were initiated as early as September 1937, no formal action was taken toward approval. In a letter to the Quartermaster General (QMG) dated 24 December 1941, The Adjutant General formally requested action be initiated to create a Meritorious Service Medal and provide designs in the event the decoration was established. Proposed designs prepared by Bailey, Banks, and Biddle and the Office of the Quartermaster General were provided to Assistant Chief of Staff G1 (Colonel Heard) by the QMG on 5 January 1942. The Assistant Chief of Staff G1 (BG Hilldring) in a response to the QMG on 3 April 1942, indicated the Secretary of War approved the design recommended by the QMG and directed action be taken to assure the design of the Legion of Merit (change of name) be ready for issue immediately after legislation authorizing it was enacted into law.
    b. An Act of Congress (Public Law 671 - 77th Congress, Chapter 508, 2d Session) on 20 July 1942, established the Legion of Merit and provided that the medal "shall have suitable appurtenances and devices and not more than four degrees, and which the President, under such rules and regulations as he shall prescribe, may award to (a) personnel of the Armed Forces of the United States and of the Government of the Commonwealth Philippines and (b) personnel of the armed forces of friendly foreign nations who, since the proclamation of an emergency by the President on 8 September 1939, shall have distinguished themselves by exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services". The medal was announced in War Department Bulletin No. 40 dated 5 August 1942. Executive Order 9260, dated 29 October 1942, by President Roosevelt, established the rules for the Legion of Merit and required the President's approval for award. However, in 1943, at the request of General George C. Marshall, approval authority for U.S. personnel was delegated to the War Department. Executive Order 10600, dated 15 March 1955, by President Eisenhower, revised approval authority. Current provisions are contained in Title 10, United States Code 1121.
    c. The reverse of the medal has the motto taken from the Great Seal of the United States "ANNUIT COEPTIS" (He [God] Has Favored Our Undertakings) and the date "MDCCLXXXII" (1782) which is the date of America's first decoration, the Badge of Military Merit, now known as the Purple Heart. The ribbon design also follows the pattern of the Purple Heart ribbon.
    d. The Legion of Merit was the first American decoration awarded to citizens of other nations. Awardees included:
    (1) Chief Commander - China's Generalissimo Chiang Kaishek was a first recipient.
    (2) Commander - Brazil's Brigadier General Amaro Soares Bittencourt was first to receive this or any of the degrees.
    (3) Officer - first to receive the Officer degree were Colonel Johanes K. Meijer of the Royal Netherlands Army, Major Herbert J. Thompson of the British Army, and Major Stephan M. Dobrowalski of the Polish Army.
    (4) Legionnaire/Legion of Merit - First award to Lieutenant Anna A. Bernatitus, heroic Navy Nurse who served at Bataan and Corregidor.
    (5) At the beginning of the North African Campaign, General Lyman L. Lemnitzer accompanied General Mark Clark by submarine to North Africa. Upon arrival, about 60 officers were awarded the Legion of Merit and were among the first awarded the medal. By some misunderstanding as to the rules governing the awards, these 60 American Officers were awarded the degree of Officer. According to General Lemnitzer, President Roosevelt was annoyed, however, he did not rescind the awards. Accordingly, these were the only American Officers awarded the Legion of Merit with a degree.
    e. Order of precedence and wear of decorations is contained in Army Regulation 670-1. Policy for awards, approving authority, supply, and issue of decorations is contained in Army Regulation 600-8-22.

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    UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES DECORATIONS AND DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DECORATIONS Empty Distinguished Flying Cross

    Post by memphismeister on Sun Aug 23, 2009 9:42 pm

    Distinguished Flying Cross
    1. Description: A Bronze cross patee on which is superimposed a four-bladed propeller, 1 11/16 inches in width. Five rays extended from the reentrant angles, forming a one-inch square. The medal is suspended from a rectangular shaped bar.

    2. Ribbon: The ribbon is 1 3/8 inches wide and consists of the following stripes: 3/32 inch Ultramarine Blue 67118; 9/64 inch White 67101; 11/32 inch Ultramarine Blue 67118; 3/64 inch White 67101; center stripe 3/32 inch Old Glory Red 67156; 3/64 inch White 67101; 11/32 inch Ultramarine Blue 67118; 9/64 inch White 67101; 3/32 inch Ultramarine Blue 67118.

    3. Criteria: The Distinguished Flying Cross is awarded to any person who, while serving in any capacity with the Armed Forces of the United States, distinguishes himself or herself by heroism or extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight. The performance of the act of heroism must be evidenced by voluntary action above and beyond the call of duty. The extraordinary achievement must have resulted in an accomplishment so exceptional and outstanding as to clearly set the individual apart from his/her comrades or from other persons in similar circumstances. Awards will be made only to recognize single acts of heroism or extraordinary achievement and will not be made in recognition of sustained operational activities against an armed enemy.

    4. Components: The following are authorized components of the Distinguished Flying Cross:

    a. Decoration (regular size): MIL-D-3943/15. NSN 8455-00-269-5748 for decoration set. NSN 8455-00-246-3826 for individual replacement medal.

    b. Decoration (miniature size): MIL-D-3943/15. NSN 8455-00-996-5006.

    c. Ribbon: MIL-R-11589/47. NSN 8455-00-252-9967.

    d. Lapel Button (metal replica of ribbon): MIL-L-11484/11. NSN 8455-00-253-0807.

    5. Background: a. The Distinguished Flying Cross was established in the Air Corps Act (Act of Congress, 2 July 1926, Public Law No. 446, 69th Congress). This act provided for award "to any person, while serving in any capacity with the Air Corps of the Army of the United States, including the National Guard and the Organized Reserves, or with the United States Navy, since the 6th day of April 1917, has distinguished, or who, after the approval of this Act, distinguishes himself by heroism or extraordinary achievement while participating in an aerial flight."

    b. Various designs from the U.S. Mint, commercial artists, and the Office of the Quartermaster General, were submitted to the Commission of Fine Arts and on 31 May 1927. The Commission approved a design submitted by Mr. Arthur E. Dubois and Miss Elizabeth Will.

    c. Initial awards of the Distinguished Flying Cross were made to persons who made record breaking long distance and endurance flights and who set altitude records. The Secretary of War authorized the first Distinguished Flying Cross to Captain Charles A. Lindbergh in a letter dated 31 May 1927. With the support of the Secretary of War, the Wright Brothers retroactively received the Distinguished Flying Cross. This award required a special Act of Congress, since the law precluded award to civilians.

    d. The current statutory requirements for award of the Distinguished Flying Cross to Army personnel is contained in Title 10, U.S.C., Section 3749; Section 6245 for Navy personnel; and Section 8749 for Air Force personnel. Enlisted personnel may be entitled to a 10% increase in retired pay under Title 10, U.S.C., Section 3991, when credited with heroism equivalent to that required for the award of the Distinguished Service Cross.

    e. Order of precedence and wear of decorations is contained in Army Regulation 670-1. Policy for awards, approving authority, supply, and issue of decorations is contained in Army Regulation 600-8-22.

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    UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES DECORATIONS AND DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DECORATIONS Empty SOLDIER’S MEDAL

    Post by memphismeister on Sun Aug 23, 2009 9:47 pm

    SOLDIER’S MEDAL

    1. Description: On a 1 3/8 inch wide Bronze octagon an eagle displayed, standing on a fasces, between two groups of stars of six and seven, above the group of six a spray of leaves. On the reverse is a shield paly of 13 pieces, on the chief the letters "US", supported by sprays of laurel and oak, around the upper edge the inscription "SOLDIER’S MEDAL" and across the face the words "FOR VALOR." In the base is a panel for the name of the recipient to be engraved. The medal is suspended from the ribbon by a rectangular-shaped metal loop with corners rounded.

    2. Ribbon: The ribbon is 1 3/8 inches wide and consists of the following stripes: 3/8 inch Ultramarine Blue 67118 on each side and the center containing 13 White and Red stripes of equal width (7 White 67101 and 6 Old Glory Red 67156).

    3. Criteria: The Soldier’s Medal is awarded to any person of the Armed Forces of the United States, or of a friendly foreign nation who while serving in any capacity with the Army of the United States, distinguished him/herself by heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy. The same degree of heroism is required as for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross. The performance must have involved personal hazard or danger and the voluntary risk of life under conditions not involving conflict with an armed enemy. Awards will not be made solely on the basis of having saved a life.

    4. Components: The following are authorized components of the Soldier’s Medal.

    a. Decoration (regular size): MIL-D-3943/16. NSN 8455-00-269-5759 for decoration set. NSN 8455-00-246-3835 for individual medal.

    b. Decoration (miniature size): MIL-D-3943/16. NSN 8455-00-996-5014.

    c. Ribbon: MIL-R-11589/137. NSN 8455-00-252-9956.

    d. Lapel Button: MIL-L-11484/12. NSN 8455-00-253-0820.

    5. Background: a. A need to recognize acts of heroism in 1922 resulted in the War Department issuing War Department orders for acts of bravery during peacetime. This led to an Act of Congress (Public Law 446-69th Congress, 2 July 1926 (44 Stat. 780)) which established the Soldier’s Medal for acts of heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy. The Secretary of War directed that the Quartermaster General prepare and submit appropriate designs of the Soldier’s Medal per letter signed by The Adjutant General dated 11 August 1926.

    b. The Secretary of War requested assistance in preparing a design from the Secretary of Treasury by letter dated 18 January 1927. In a response to the Secretary of War by letter dated 22 January 1927, the Secretary of Treasury indicated that the Director of the Mint had been instructed to request the Engraver of the Mint at Philadelphia to submit designs and model. A proposed design was completed and forwarded from the Philadelphia Mint on 22 June 1927 and forwarded to the Commission of Fine Arts for comments. The Commission of Fine Arts in a letter to the Secretary of War dated 27 February 1928 stated.. "It would be a very serious disappointment to this Commission, after all its struggles to obtain good medals, to have to rely on work of this character. One of the fundamental objections to the designs submitted is a lack of that simplicity which should characterize all medals of the highest class. The designs and casts are disapproved and returned". Subsequent designs were submitted and rejected by the Commission in November 1929. The Quartermaster General forwarded a letter to Mr. Gaetano Cecere, New York, NY on 20 January 1930, requesting a design and indicating the War Department would pay not more than $1500.00 for an approved design and cast. Mr. Cecere provided a proposed design in April 1930 that was approved by the Commission on 5 May 1930.

    c. Title 10, United States Code (USC), Section 3750 contains current statutory requirements for the Soldier’s Medal. Enlisted personnel may be entitled to an increase in retired pay under Title 10, USC 3991 when credited with heroism equivalent to that required for the award of the Distinguished Service Cross.

    d. Order of precedence and wear of decorations is contained in Army Regulation 670-1. Policy for awards, approving authority, supply, and issue of decorations is contained in Army Regulation 600-8-22.UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES DECORATIONS AND DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DECORATIONS Soldme10UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES DECORATIONS AND DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DECORATIONS Soldme11
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    UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES DECORATIONS AND DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DECORATIONS Empty Bronze Star

    Post by memphismeister on Sun Aug 23, 2009 9:53 pm

    1. Description: A Bronze star 1 ½ inches in circumscribing diameter. In the center thereof is a 3/16-inch diameter superimposed bronze star, the center line of all rays of both stars coinciding. The reverse has the inscription "HEROIC OR MERITORIOUS ACHIEVEMENT" and a space for the name of the recipient to be engraved. The star is suspended from the ribbon by a rectangular shaped metal loop with the corners rounded.

    2. Ribbon: The ribbon is 1 3/8 inches wide and consists of the following stripes: 1/32 inch White 67101; 9/16 inch Scarlet 67111; 1/32 inch White; center stripe 1/8 inch Ultramarine Blue 67118; 1/32 inch White; 9/16 inch Scarlet; and 1/32 inch White.

    3. Criteria: a. The Bronze Star Medal is awarded to any person who, while serving in any capacity in or with the military of the United States after 6 December 1941, distinguished himself or herself by heroic or meritorious achievement or service, not involving participation in aerial flight, while engaged in an action against an enemy of the United States; while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force; or while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party.

    b. Awards may be made for acts of heroism, performed under circumstances described above, which are of lesser degree than required for the award of the Silver Star.

    c. Awards may be made to recognize single acts of merit or meritorious service. The required achievement or service while of lesser degree than that required for the award of the Legion of Merit must nevertheless have been meritorious and accomplished with distinction.

    4. Components: The following are authorized components of the Bronze Star Medal:

    a. Decoration (regular size): MIL-D-3943/22. NSN for decoration set is 8455-00-269-5749. NSN for replacement medal is 8455-00-246-3829.

    b. Decoration (miniature size): MIL-D-3943/22. NSN 8455-00-996-5004.

    c. Ribbon: MIL-R-11589/18. NSN 8455-00-252-9915.

    d. Lapel Button: MIL-R-11484/16. NSN 8455-00-265-4889.

    5. Background: a. General George C. Marshall, in a memorandum to President Roosevelt dated February 3, 1944, wrote: "The fact that the ground troops, Infantry in particular, lead miserable lives of extreme discomfort and are the ones who must close in personal combat with the enemy, makes the maintenance of their morale of great importance. The award of the Air Medal have had an adverse reaction on the ground troops, particularly the Infantry Riflemen who are now suffering the heaviest losses, air or ground, in the Army, and enduring the greatest hardships." The Air Medal had been adopted two years earlier to raise airmen’s morale.

    b. President Roosevelt authorized the Bronze Star Medal by Executive Order 9419 dated 4 February 1944, retroactive to 7 December 1941. This authorization was announced in War Department Bulletin No. 3, dated 10 February 1944. The Executive Order was amended by President Kennedy, per Executive Order 11046 dated 24 August 1962, to expand the authorization to include those serving with friendly forces.

    c. As a result of a study conducted in 1947, the policy was implemented that authorized the retroactive award of the Bronze Star Medal to soldiers who had received the Combat Infantryman Badge or the Combat Medical Badge during World War II. The basis for doing this was that the badges were awarded only to soldiers who had borne the hardships which resulted in General Marshall’s support of the Bronze Star Medal. Both badges required a recommendation by the commander and a citation in orders.

    d. Order of precedence and wear of decorations is contained in Army Regulation 670-1. Policy for awards, approving authority, supply, and issue of decorations is contained in AR 600-8-22.

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    UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES DECORATIONS AND DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DECORATIONS Empty Purple Heart

    Post by memphismeister on Sun Aug 23, 2009 9:58 pm

    1. Description: A Purple heart within a Gold border, 1 3/8 inches wide, containing a profile of General George Washington. Above the heart appears a shield of the Washington Coat of Arms (a White shield with two Red bars and three Red stars in chief) between sprays of Green leaves. The reverse consists of a raised Bronze heart with the words "FOR MILITARY MERIT" below the coat of arms and leaves.

    2. Ribbon: The ribbon is 1 3/8 inches wide and consists of the following stripes: 1/8 inch White 67101; 1 1/8 inches Purple 67115; and 1/8 inch White 67101.

    3. Criteria: a. The Purple Heart is awarded in the name of the President of the United States to any member of an Armed Force who, while serving with the U.S. Armed Services after 5 April 1917, has been wounded or killed, or who has died or may hereafter die after being wounded;

    (1) In any action against an enemy of the United States;

    (2) In any action with an opposing armed force of a foreign country in which the Armed Forces of the United States are or have been engaged;

    (3) While serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party;

    (4) As a result of an act of any such enemy of opposing armed forces;

    (5) As the result of an act of any hostile foreign force;

    (6) After 28 March 1973, as a result of an international terrorist attack against the United States or a foreign nation friendly to the United States, recognized as such an attack by the Secretary of the department concerned, or jointly by the Secretaries of the departments concerned if persons from more than one department are wounded in the attack; or,

    (7) After 28 March 1973, as a result of military operations, while serving outside the territory of the United States as part of a peacekeeping force.

    (Cool After 7 December 1941, by weapon fire while directly engaged in armed conflict, regardless of the fire causing the wound.

    (9) While held as a prisoner of war or while being taken captive.

    b. A wound for which the award is made must have required treatment by a medical officer.

    4. Components:

    a. Decoration (regular size): MIL-D-3943/24; NSN for set 8455-00-269-5757; individual medal 8455-00-246-3833.

    b. Decoration (miniature size): MIL-D-3943//24.

    c. Ribbon: MIL-R-11589/126. NSN 8455-00-9948.

    d. Lapel Button (metal replica of ribbon bar): MIL-L-11484/18. NSN 8455-00-253-0818.

    5. Background: a. The original Purple Heart, designated as the Badge of Military Merit, was established by General George Washington by order from his headquarters at Newburgh, New York, August 7, 1782. The writings of General Washington quoted in part:

    "The General ever desirous to cherish a virtuous ambition in his soldiers, as well as to foster and encourage every species of Military Merit, directs that whenever any singularly meritorious action is performed, the author of it shall be permitted to wear on his facings over the left breast, the figure of a heart in purple cloth or silk, edged with narrow lace or binding. Not only instances of unusual gallantry, but also of extraordinary fidelity and essential service in any way shall meet with a due reward".

    b. So far as the known surviving records show, this honor badge was granted to only three men, all of them noncommissioned officers: Sergeant Daniel Bissell of the 2d Connecticut Regiment of the Continental Line; Sergeant William Brown of the 5th Connecticut Regiment of the Continental Line, and Sergeant Elijah Churchill of the 2d Continental Dragoons, which was also a Connecticut Regiment. The original Purple Heart depicted on the first page is a copy of the badge awarded to Sergeant Elijah Churchill and is now owned by the New Windsor Cantonment, National Temple Hill Association, PO Box 525, Vails Gate, NY 12584. The only other known original badge is the badge awarded to Sergeant William Brown and is in the possession of The Society of the Cincinnati, New Hampshire Branch but differs in design by not having any lettering embroidered on the heart and the leaves are at the top only with a larger spray of leaves at the base.

    c. Subsequent to the Revolution, the Order of the Purple Heart had fallen into disuse and no further awards were made. By Order of the President of the United States, the Purple Heart was revived on the 200th Anniversary of George Washington's birth, out of respect to his memory and military achievements, by War Department General Orders No. 3, dated 22 February 1932. The criteria was announced in War Department Circular dated 22 February 1932 and authorized award to soldiers, upon their request, who had been awarded the Meritorious Service Citation Certificate or were authorized to wear wound chevrons subsequent to 5 April 1917.

    d. During the early period of World War II (7 Dec 41 to 22 Sep 43), the Purple Heart was awarded both for wounds received in action against the enemy and for meritorious performance of duty. With the establishment of the Legion of Merit, by an Act of Congress, the practice of awarding the Purple Heart for meritorious service was discontinued. By Executive Order 9277, dated 3 December 1942, the decoration was extended to be applicable to all services and the order required that regulations of the Services be uniform in application as far as practicable. This executive order also authorized award only for wounds received.

    e. Executive Order 10409, dated 12 February 1952, revised authorizations to include the Service Secretaries subject to approval of the Secretary of Defense. Executive Order 11016, dated 25 April 1962, included provisions for posthumous award of the Purple Heart. Executive Order 12464, dated 23 February 1984, authorized award of the Purple Heart as a result of terrorist attacks or while serving as part of a peacekeeping force subsequent to 28 March 1973.

    f. The Senate approved an amendment to the 1985 Defense Authorization Bill on 13 June 1985, which changed the precedent from immediately above the Good Conduct Medal to immediately above the Meritorious Service Medals. Public Law 99-145 authorized the award for wounds received as a result of "friendly fire". Public Law 104-106 expanded the eligibility date, authorizing award of the Purple Heart to a former prisoner of war who was wounded before 25 April 1962.

    g. The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year1998 (Public Law 105-85) changed the criteria to delete authorization for award of the Purple Heart Medal to any civilian national of the United States while serving under competent authority in any capacity with the Armed Forces. This change was effective 18 May 1998.

    h. Order of precedence and wear of decorations is contained in Army Regulation 670-1. Policy for awards, approving authority, supply, and issue of decorations is contained in AR 600-8-22.

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    UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES DECORATIONS AND DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DECORATIONS Empty Defense Meritorious Service Medal

    Post by memphismeister on Sun Jul 11, 2010 6:42 pm

    Defense Meritorious Service Medal
    1. Description: The medal is one and one-half inches in diameter overall, consisting of a circular wreath of laurel tied with a ribbon at the base;
    in the center is a pentagon shape, superimposed over the pentagon is an American eagle with wings upraised and overlapping the wreath, standing on the bottom edge of the pentagon.
    On the reverse the medal has the inscription, "Defense Meritorious Service" in three horizontal lines; and around the bottom are the words, "United States of America,"
    with space between for engraving the recipient's name.

    2. Criteria: The Defense Meritorious Service Medal is awarded to those members of the United States Armed Forces who have distinguished themselves
    by meritorious service or achievement while assigned to a joint activity. The DMSM is usually awarded to those serving in leadership positions and performing exceptionally outstanding work.

    3. Background:

    a. This is the third highest peacetime Defense award.
    b. Designed by Mildred Orloff and sculpted by Lewis J. King, Jr., both of the Institute of Heraldry.
    c. The Defense Meritorious Service Medal was established by Executive Order 12019 on November 3, 1977,
    when President Carter signed the order establishing it..



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    UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES DECORATIONS AND DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DECORATIONS Empty Meritorious Service Medal

    Post by memphismeister on Sun Jul 11, 2010 6:54 pm

    Meritorious Service Medal

    1. Description: A bronze medal, 1 1/2 inches in diameter
    overall, consisting of six rays issuant from the upper three
    points of a five-pointed star with
    beveled edges and containing two smaller stars defined by
    incised outlines; in front of the lower part of the star an
    eagle with wings upraised standing upon two upward
    curving branches of laurel tied with a ribbon between the feet of the eagle.
    The reverse has the encircled inscriptions "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA"
    and "MERITORIOUS SERVICE".

    2. Ribbon: The ribbon is 1 3/8 inches wide and consists
    of the following stripes: 1/8 inch
    Crimson 67112; 1/4 inch White 67101; center 5/8 inch Crimson;
    1/4 inch White; and 1/8 inch Crimson.

    3. Criteria: Awarded to members of the Armed Forces of the United
    States who distinguished themselves by outstanding non-combat
    meritorious achievement or service to the United States
    subsequent to 16 January 1969. Normally, the acts or
    services rendered must be comparable to that required
    for the Legion of Merit but in a duty of lesser
    though considerable responsibility.

    4. Components: The following are authorized components of the Meritorious Service Medal:

    a. Decoration set (regular size): MIL-D-3943/66. NSN 8455-00-450-3728. Replacement medal NSN 8455-00-439-2142.

    b. Decoration (miniature size): MIL-D-3943/66. Not stocked.

    c. Ribbon: MIL-R-11589/172. NSN 8455-00-439-2143.

    d. Lapel Button (metal replica of ribbon): MIL-L-11484/85. NSN 8455-00-439-2141.

    5. Background: a. At Tri-Department Awards Conference, 5-6 February 1968,
    there was a discussion on the need for a third meritorious award to provide
    appropriate recognition for noncombat achievement or service comparable to
    the Bronze Star Medal for combat achievement or service. It was felt that
    the Legion of Merit’s prestige was slipping because it was being used with
    increasing frequency to reward service below Legion of Merit standard,
    but higher than that required for the Commendation Medal.

    b. A proposed executive order was prepared in April 1968 and forwarded
    for approval to the Military Departments. An ad hoc committee was formed by
    the Secretary of Defense (M&RA) to select a name. On 8 November 1968, the
    committee unanimously approved the name "Meritorious Service Medal".
    President Johnson established the Meritorious Service Medal per Executive
    Order No. 11448 dated 16 January 1969. The Executive Order was amended by
    President Reagan per Executive Order 12312, dated 2 July 1981, to
    authorize award to members of the armed forces of friendly foreign nations.

    c. The decoration was designed by Mr. Jay Morris, The Institute of Heraldry,
    and the design was approved by the committee on 20 March 1969.
    The ribbon design purposely follows the colors used for the Legion of Merit to reflect the parallel between the two medals. The eagle, symbol of the nation, stands
    on laurel branches denoting achievement. The star is used to represent
    the military service and the rays emanating therefrom denote the
    constant efforts of individuals to achieve through excellent and
    meritorious service.

    d. Order of precedence and wear of decorations is contained in Army Regulation (AR) 670-1. Policy for awards, approving authority, supply, and issue of decorations is contained in AR 600-8-22.

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    UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES DECORATIONS AND DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DECORATIONS Empty Air Medal

    Post by memphismeister on Sun Jul 11, 2010 7:03 pm

    Air Medal

    1. Description: A bronze compass rose 1 11/16 inches circumscribing diameter and charged with an eagle volant carrying two lightning flashes in its talons. A fleur-de-lis at the top point holds the suspension ring. The points of the compass rose on the reverse are modeled with the central portion plain for engraving the name of the recipient.

    2. Ribbon: The ribbon is 1 3/8 inches wide and consists of the following stripes: 1/8 inch ultramarine blue 67118; ¼ inch golden orange 67109; center 5/8 inch ultramarine blue; ¼ inch golden orange; and 1/8 inch ultramarine blue.

    3. Criteria: The Air Medal is awarded to any person who, while serving in any capacity in or with the armed forces of the United States, shall have distinguished himself by meritorious achievement while participating in aerial flight. Awards may be made to recognize single acts of merit or heroism or for meritorious service. Award of the Air Medal is primarily intended to recognize those personnel who are on current crew member or non-crew member flying status which requires them to participate in aerial flight on a regular and frequent basis in the performance of their primary duties. However, it may also be awarded to certain other individuals whose combat duties require regular and frequent flying in other than a passenger status or individuals who perform a particularly noteworthy act while performing the function of a crew member but who are not on flying status. These individuals must make a discernible contribution to the operational land combat mission or to the mission of the aircraft in flight. Examples of personnel whose combat duties require them to fly include those in the attack elements of units involved in air-land assaults against an armed enemy and those directly involved in airborne command and control of combat operations. Involvement in such activities, normally at the brigade/group level and below, serves only to establish eligibility for award of the Air Medal; the degree of heroism, meritorious achievement or exemplary service determines who should receive the award. Awards will not be made to individuals who use air transportation solely for the purpose of moving from point to point in a combat zone.

    4. Components: The following are authorized components of the Air Medal and the applicable specifications for each:

    a. Decoration (regular size): MIL-D-3943/23. NSN for decoration set is 8455-00-269-5747. For replacement medal NSN 8455-00-246-3837.

    b. Decoration (miniature size): MIL-D-3943/23. NSN 8455-00-996-5002.

    c. Ribbon: MIL-R-11589/7. NSN 8455-00-252-9963.

    d. Lapel Button: MIL-L-11484/17. NSN 8455-00-257-4308.

    5. Background: a. In a letter from the Secretary of War to the Director, Bureau of Budget, dated 9 March 1942, the Secretary submitted a proposed executive order establishing the Air Medal for award to any person who, while serving in any capacity of the Army of the United States, distinguishes himself by meritorious achievement while participating in an aerial flight The Secretary of War, in his request, stated "The Distinguished Flying Cross is available only for heroism or extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight…It is desired not to cheapen the Distinguished Flying Cross by awarding it for achievement not bordering on the heroic. It is, however, important to reward personnel for meritorious service."

    b. The Air Medal was authorized by President Roosevelt by Executive Order 9158, dated 11 May 1942, and established the award for "any person who, while serving in any capacity in the Army, Navy, Marine Corps or Coast Guard of the United States subsequent to September 8, 1939, distinguishes, or has distinguished, himself by meritorious achievement while participating in an aerial flight." Authorization was announced in War Department Bulletin No. 25, dated 25 May 1942. Executive Order 9242-A, dated 11 September 1942 amended the previous Executive Order to read "in any capacity in or with the Army".

    c. In July 1942, the Office of The Quartermaster General (OQMG), forwarded a letter to twenty-two artists offering an opportunity to submit designs for consideration. The design selected was submitted by Walker Hancock and approved by the Secretary of War on 31 December 1942. The designer, Walker Hancock, had been inducted into the Army and assigned to Camp Livingston, Louisiana. He was ordered to temporary duty effective 16 November 1942 to G1 War Department to work on the medal. The Chief of Staff approved the ribbon design prepared by OQMG on 26 August 1942.

    d. Oak leaf clusters were initially used to denote subsequent awards of the Air Medal. The number of additional awards were so great that the oak leaf clusters did not fit on the ribbon. As a result, the policy was changed in September 1968 to require the use of numbers to indicate subsequent awards of the Air Medal.

    e. The Air Medal may be awarded for service during peacetime; however, approval authority for peacetime awards is not delegated to field commanders.

    f. Order of precedence and wear of decorations is contained in Army Regulation (AR) 670-1. Policy for awards, approving authority, supply, and issue of decorations is contained in AR 600-8-22.

    UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES DECORATIONS AND DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DECORATIONS Airmed10
    UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES DECORATIONS AND DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DECORATIONS Airmed12

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